Your Art New York

SaveArtSpace will be transforming advertising spaces into public art in The Largest City in America! All artists nationwide (Including Puerto Rico and US Territories) are encouraged to Submit! 

Submit Now for your Opportunity to have your art displayed on advertisement space in New York City.

Deadline to Submit: June 30, 2019

Guest Curator: Tiffany B. Chanel

- Each artist is encouraged to submit up to ten (10) images. $10 per image.

- We will announce the selected artist via social media and email.

- There is a 2 to 6-week turnaround time for notification and installation after each deadline.


Connect with previously selected Your Art New York artists!

Spring 2019 - Gianni Lee

Gianni Lee is a multidisciplinary visual artist utilizing diverse mediums to examine and explore themes of racial inequality, communication and technology.

Lee’s multimedia work combines materials including painting, drawing, photography against a post-apocalyptic and futuristic landscape. Gianni has two distinct styles  of intricate compositions that populate the fine art world as well as street art. His street-art incorporates colorful skeletal figures while is fine art focuses on alien-like subjects to explore the technological, political, social and racial climate in America while depict the plight of black people.

“My subject matter is based on an on going story with real characters that I created” says Gianni. “I decontextualize, reconstruct and regurgitate everything i see and feel on the canvas based on concepts, motifs and issues that mirror society. I make sure to explore the technological, political, social and racial climate in America while painting a post-apocalyptic and futuristic landscape.”

As Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition Artist-in-Residence, he presented his inaugural solo-exhibition “Why Don’t You Hear Me?” (2017). And in 2018 he presented his follow up “They Sat Back, They Let it Happen” in Los Angeles. His permanent street installations are currently on view in the streets of Paris, London, Bulgaria, New York City, Cuba, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia, just to name a few.

Lee lives and works in New York and Los Angeles.

My subject matter is based on an ongoing story with real characters that I created. I decontextualize, reconstruct and regurgitate it on the canvas based on concepts, motifs and issues that mirror society. I make sure to explore the technological, political, social and racial climate in America while painting a post-apocalyptic and futuristic landscape.

Connect with Gianni on Instagram: @giannilee


“This image comes from my biographic graphic novel Detour. Detour is based on my experience as an international student. I came to New York with my artist’s dream. After a few years of struggle, my career has not only improved, but I have lost in this steel city. Two years ago, my friend Shang and I crossed United States from New York to California by hitchhiking. I explores questions of identity, the meaning of life, and alienation through an odyssey across an American landscape that is at once hospitable and hostile.”

Jie studied visual storytelling and received his MFA from the School of Visual Arts in 2018. His work can be seen on book covers, magazines, and websites.

Connect with Jie on Instagram: @kidrenjie


Chloe Chiasson is a New York City-based artist raised in Port Neches, Texas. Chloe received her Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion with a minor in Psychology in 2016 from the University of Texas at Austin and then began to pursue art shortly after. Chloe is now a Master of Fine Arts candidate at the New York Academy of Art where she is studying painting. She lives in Brooklyn and makes work in Manhattan.

My passion is art and people. My interest is in the people who are in between: in between worlds, in between genders, in between countries and borders. My position “in between” has me defined by, trapped in, resisting and breaking free from the complex cultural debates of sexuality, gender, and subjectivity. My work is a rejection of the mutual exclusiveness of masculinity and femininity in favor of a simultaneous coexistence, focusing on the process through which we come to find our authentic selves and the struggles that arise as we assert those selves within constraining environments. "What are you?" I am a woman, and I am using a language and culture that is given to be masculine. I am invading this field and claiming it for my own use.

Connect with Chloe on Instagram: @chloechiasson_


Amy Smith is a self-educated contemporary artist. Born in New Jersey, but not built for the cold, she moved to Los Angeles where she found inspiration, mentors, and support in the Street Art community surrounding L.A. In her Collage Portrait Series, Amy Smith uses photography, hand cut stencils, and torn recycled fashion magazine pieces to simultaneously represent her love of fashion and her contempt for consumerism. Her intention is to offer viewers the opportunity to choose one’s own path of empowerment, leaving behind what society demands.

Amy Smith’s work has been featured in a number of private collections, residences, businesses, and in popular tv/film sets including shows like Dear White People, Key and Peele, Casual, and many others. 

“I am a photographer and artist. I also love to collaborate with very talented photographers. The inspiration for this piece was originally shot by a photographer Robert Bean Hammond. His portrayal and emotion with my muse Rachel Isabella was breathtaking. I created my own vision imagining serenity while being showered with positivity and beauty. This piece I named, ‘Head in the Clouds.’ My inspiration continues to come from strong women and street art. I focus on sharing powerful and positive messages through my art. I want men and women alike to see and feel strength in every portrait.”

Connect with Amy on Instagram: @artbycolorscape 


B.D. White entered the art scene by painting hundreds of streetlight bases throughout New York City. Despite his spinal injury, he earned a reputation as a prolific street artist using spray paint and stencils as his main medium.

From the beginning B.D. knew he was always going to be an artist. What he didn’t count on was a sporting accident at the age of 18 that left him with a broken back, paralyzed and in a wheelchair. The art world is highly competitive and getting the initial show or big break is sometimes slow in coming. Undeterred, B.D. decided to take his works directly to the public via the gallery known as the streets of New York.  What some call “street art,” B.D. dubs “mindful vandalism” and despite his inability to easily flee if discovered, B.D. began to create compelling art on the streets in both Manhattan and Brooklyn. Taking advantage of his seated position, his works were uniquely placed very low on walls and street lamps, areas where others may not have thought of using.

The artwork's aesthetic appeal and poignant messaging stood out, like “The Hashtagger”, a bronze sculpture that is far from your usual hastily sprayed tags and simple wheat paste works. It is Rodin’s Thinker sculpture with a modern update; an iPhone.

Inspired by Shepard Fairey's style, B.D. has taken the stencil technique to unprecedented levels of complexity; utilizing 60 to 95 stencil layers per painting. The works are visually stunning, however the concept and message are most interesting. B.D.’s recent works depicts an astronaut in multiple states of movement, sometimes alone, sometimes entwined in a tragic embrace with a female form. The astronaut represents man at his most lonely and distant self, though present in many of the paintings with the female love interest, the seemingly insurmountable obstacle of love lost, and longing is obvious.

B.D. White is not the first artist to overcome physical limitations. When his hands became to arthritic to paint, Renoir strapped brushes to his wrists and continued on and Chuck Close overcame near total paralysis to continue as one of the most significant living American artists. B.D. expertly demonstrate that nothing can dampen or contain an artist’s almost instinctual, obsessive need to create and share with the world.

To date, B.D. has shown in group exhibitions in New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Chicago, Miami, and Berlin. An installation at the World Trade Center, exposure at Scope Art Fair during Art Basel in Miami, a month long solo show at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery in Manhattan, as well as his continued work on the streets of New York; have garnered him a strong and growing collector base.

Connect with B.D. on Instagram at @BDWhite.


Bushwick Street Art is a native run graffiti collective creating safe spaces for native and new artist to create while bridging the gap in the art scene in Bushwick. From BSA comes Invasion of the Stickers a worldwide sticker art collection and museum style exhibition. This medium of art is done on postal stickers. 

Connect with Bushwick Street Art. on Instagram at @bushwickstreetart.


Ken Lavey is a lens based artist and technician in New York City. He holds a BFA from the School of Visual Arts and was a resident artist at the Royal College of Art in London. He was a winner of Surface Magazine Avant Guardian competition in 2015. His photographs have been featured by Vice, A New Nothing, The Latent Image, and others. He has exhibited as part of Mary Mary Projects in 2017, Miami Project 2016, International Photo Festival Leiden 2015, Photoville 2015, Photo L.A. 2015 and others.

This work comes from the kind of ultra male spaces that I have been photographing for years. Hardware stores, garages, second-hand electronics stores, the ubiquitous junk drawer. These places are especially fertile ground. The primary decision in making these compositions is determining the object’s ideal view. Which way should these objects point themselves? Should it be looked at from the front? From behind? In what direction should its extremities protrude? Does it matter which is the front or which is the back? These decisions allow the objects to be fully described, and to establish interesting resemblances and associations.

What color could complicate things? What kind of textures and surfaces could be in conversation with the subject? I consider what other objects I have, and how their interactions can create evocative combinations. How can I use space and light? These decisions emphasize and confuse the thing’s function and scale. The work is nourishing and debauched. The photographs transform these unexpected objects, their original use is obscured. They’re new. These things are freed from the confines of their original purpose and interpretation.